Drivers & Pedestrians

To improve pedestrian safety, the Florida Department of Transportation will construct a raised median and five mid-block crossings with overhead mounted pedestrian signals. The signals are called High-Intensity Activated crossWalK beacon (HAWK) signals or pedestrian hybrid beacons. These signals will be located at the following locations:

  • Just south of Maravilla Lane
  • Just north of Ricardo Avenue
  • At Coronado Road
  • Midway between Hanson Street/Linhart Avenue
  • Just north of Lafayette Street

What is a HAWK signal?
“HAWK” stands for High‐intensity Activated crosswalk. It is intended to provide a signalized crossing for pedestrian while reducing delay to vehicular traffic.

How is it different than other traffic signals?
While it looks similar to a traditional pedestrian signal, the HAWK operates a little differently. When not in use, it will remain dark allowing vehicular traffic to proceed without stopping.

A pedestrian pushing the button begins a sequence of six movements. First, the signal begins flashing yellow to indicate to drivers that a pedestrian is waiting to enter the crosswalk. This is followed by a steady yellow indication, advising drivers to stop (just like a traditional traffic signal). The signal then turns solid red, requiring drivers to stop at the stop line. Finally, the signal will flash red indicating that drivers must stop, but may proceed if the street is clear—the same as they would at a traditional signal operating with flashing red indications. The signal will then return to dark.

During these sequences the pedestrians will see the same indications they see at a traditional traffic signal:

  • Hand symbol (Don’t Walk)
  • Flashing Hand symbol with countdown timer 
  • Walking Person symbol (Walk)